Archive for Projects

Project: Columnar Norway Spruce Trees

September 20, 2017 |  by  |  Photos, Projects  |  No Comments

Columnar Norway Spruce Tree: 3ten.ca

Spruce trees? What? Yes – let’s plant some Columnar Norway Spruce trees. We finished the split rail fence a few weeks ago and we wanted to highlight the end where it opens up to the driveway. What better way than with some stunning trees. These trees are perfect for our climate and they will grow to be quite big – 6 feet wide by 20 feet tall. Okay, time to plant them!

Columnar Norway Spruce Trees

First, pick out your trees.

Columnar Norway Spruce Trees: 3ten.ca

We found these trees at Classic Landscaping which is only about 12 minutes away from our home.

Columnar Norway Spruce Trees: 3ten.ca

Load them up and bring them home – be sure you plant right away! Grab some fresh dirt, too.

Columnar Norway Spruce Trees: 3ten.ca

Lily supervising – she likes projects that involve car rides.

Columnar Norway Spruce Trees: 3ten.ca

Once you’ve got your tree, pick your spot. Be sure to stand back and take a look from different angles – you only want to dig once, trust me.

Columnar Norway Spruce Trees: 3ten.ca

Time to dig. Dig a hole twice as wide and 1.5 times as deep.

Columnar Norway Spruce Trees: 3ten.ca

Columnar Norway Spruce Trees: 3ten.ca

Take the tree out of the pot and massage the roots. You want a bit of the soil to fall away. Then, place it in the hole and fill with the fresh dirt.

Columnar Norway Spruce Trees: 3ten.ca

Columnar Norway Spruce Trees: 3ten.ca

Pat down the sides, make sure the tree is straight and then water it. That’s it, you’re done!

Water it every day for about 10 days and then you’re in good shape.

Columnar Norway Spruce Trees: 3ten.ca

Columnar Norway Spruce Trees: 3ten.ca

Columnar Norway Spruce Trees: 3ten.ca

Well, there you have it – two beautiful Columnar Norway Spruce trees anchoring our split rail fence. Thanks for visiting and I’ll see you again this weekend. Time for some fall treats, don’t you think?

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Project: Split Rail Fence

September 9, 2017 |  by  |  Projects  |  No Comments

Split Rail Fence: 3ten.ca

Sometimes summer home or property improvements end up being a far lager feat than you ever anticipated. This fence was just that – a huge feat! First, the drive way is more than 250 feet long and we wanted more than 220 feet of it fenced – both sides. That’s 44 post holes and more than 120 rails. The task of treating them all took about 8 hours, 4 hours twice. We treated the wood since we want it to retain it’s natural cedar colour, not grey or weather.

The next big part? Oh, clicking before we dig, of course. Guess what? The gas line runs down one side of the driveway while electricity runs down the other. Guess who gets to dig 44 post holes, 27 inches deep, I might add. Me – and Bryce, of course. The best part of building the fence was eating all those extra earned calories! Oh, and having pride in our property and the joy of getting the job done, and well at that!

Split Rail Fence

First – purchase you wood and treat it.

Split Rail Fence: 3ten.ca

Split Rail Fence: 3ten.ca

Second – you’ll want to lay out some rails where you want your fence to run, not because you’ll dig all the holes first, but rather so you can problem solve if there are any issues – and so you know where you’d like to start.

Split Rail Fence: 3ten.ca

Split Rail Fence: 3ten.ca

We measured between each post to ensure they were between 158 – 162 inches wide. No way did we want our driveway to feel enclosed, or have the fence look wonky.

Split Rail Fence: 3ten.ca

We also got 14 yards of road crush delivered to even out some of the wear and tear, but also because we needed about 1 yard total for the bottom of the posts. You don’t set cedar posts into concrete – it’ll discolour the wood. Rather, you dig down 27 inches, add in 3 inches of road crush for drainage and then set your post and backfill. We used a spade shovel, a post hole digger and also a short handled tile shovel. The tile shovel was my best friend throughout this whole project.

Oh, and it should be noted that Bryce and I each had our own tools and we got so used to the way they worked when we accidentally picked up the other’s post hole digger we found it uncomfortable and wanted our own tool back – so funny!

Split Rail Fence: 3ten.ca

Split Rail Fence: 3ten.ca

Split Rail Fence: 3ten.ca

One is done!

Split Rail Fence: 3ten.ca

Third tip – you’ll leap frog each post hole since each post sits in the ground differently. Dig and then set the rails, then dig again.

We need to rake, too.

Split Rail Fence: 3ten.ca

Some details.

Split Rail Fence: 3ten.ca

Split Rail Fence: 3ten.ca

All done! Just need to level out the rest of the road crush.

Split Rail Fence: 3ten.ca

Split Rail Fence: 3ten.ca

Looks pretty good, eh? Now, time for a gate.

Thanks so much for visiting and I’ll see you again soon.

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Project: 1978 Boler After

August 12, 2017 |  by  |  Photos, Projects  |  No Comments

After racing down to Lethbridge to buy the original 1978 Boler we had a lot of time to talk about how we wanted to fix it up – what to keep (the double bunk), what to get rid of (those orange curtains) and what to add (a toilet). The process of discussing and planning is just about as much fun as the doing. All in all, we love how it turned out. Check out these photos of our 1978 Boler project. If you want to see the whole process, then click on over to Tumblr.

1978 Boler After

New paint job! We call her Sunny D. First, sunny because she’s bright yellow and D, well, that’s because we bought it off a man named Denis. So fitting. Okay, let’s check out Sunny D!

1978 Boler After: 3ten.ca

The door is all fixed and beautiful matching propane tanks to match her funky style.

1978 Boler After: 3ten.ca

Time to head inside and turn right. The dining table – new top, refinished cushions and freshly painted insulation.

1978 Boler After: 3ten.ca

Turn left and the Boler completely opens up – look at how fresh the grey paint looks! Everything is so lighted up and clean.

1978 Boler After: 3ten.ca

Details – it’s all about the details. This little shoe box keeps sandals up and out of the way.

1978 Boler After: 3ten.ca

The kitchen is brighter with a new white backsplash.

1978 Boler After: 3ten.ca

Fresh and clean.

1978 Boler After: 3ten.ca

More details!

1978 Boler After: 3ten.ca

It took a long time, yet the fridge is so good looking.

1978 Boler After: 3ten.ca

New, never used, toilet. It was tricky to install, yet worth it.

1978 Boler After: 3ten.ca

Beautiful new hardwood (not laminate) floor – we even replaced the subfloor.

1978 Boler After: 3ten.ca

Curtains – much better than the orange ones. The orange ones actually fell apart in the wash. It was like washing tissue paper.

1978 Boler After: 3ten.ca

Beautiful new fabric cushions – and jazzy yellow pillows!

1978 Boler After: 3ten.ca

The back end of our 1978 Boler, Sunny D.

1978 Boler After: 3ten.ca

Well, there you have it – our 1978 Boler after photos. Check out Tumblr for all the details on what we did. Thanks for visiting and happy camping!

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